Nadege Green

Nadege Green loves only-in-Miami stories. After five years as a Miami Herald reporter, she is convinced Miami is the best news town ever. Really, you can’t make up some of the stuff that happens here.

Nadege has covered local city governments and as a sub-beat, Miami’s Haitian community.

She is a graduate of Barry University where she majored in English with the hope of someday becoming the next great novelist — she’s still working on that dream.

Gun shot injuries in Miami-Dade County are largely happening in a cluster of neighborhoods and disproportionately affect young black men, according to a recent study.

This month two black men, Philando Castile and Alton Sterling were shot and killed by police officers in Minnesota and Louisiana.

The trauma of those events can be seen and  felt in black communities around the country.

Soul Sisters leadership collective is a Miami nonprofit helping to address the mental health consequences after police–involved shootings.

Tanisha Douglas is co-founder of the collective and a social worker and she helped create spaces in South Florida, for people, specifically black people, to work out how they were feeling after these killings.

This story originally ran on September 22, 2015

I was born and raised in Miami, but my very Haitian mom always kept true to her roots — especially whenever I didn’t feel well.

Have a sore throat? Sour orange leaves can fix that.  A tummy ache? Freshly picked mint from the backyard will ease the pain.

She is a believer of remed fey, or bush medicine.

A group of women in Miami walked into a dental office seeking pap smears and treatment for yeast infections.

It was a protest against a recently passed law that will cut funding to women’s reproductive healthcare in Florida.

Marjorie Burnett is one of the founding members of Karen Peterson and Dancers, a mixed-ability dance company in Miami.

Burnett has cerebral palsy, and in the latest piece she’s rehearsing  she wants to challenge how people look at her because she’s in wheelchair.

“I want to show the audience that I’m a real person,” she says.

Burnett, 54, is performing with guest choreographer Pioneer Winter.  The piece is entitled “Gimp Gait,” a nod to the stereotypes and slurs used against people with disabilities.

A Florida-based medical staffing company must pay a fine of more than $100,000 for posting an ad in New York that specified “no Haitians ” should apply.

Interim Healthcare, which has its corporate office in Sunrise, offers healthcare services across the country through 300 different franchises. 

The ad appeared in a local Pennysaver in Rockland County, New York.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneidman investigated the ad posting and found the discriminatory language was a violation of civil rights laws.

The Florida Department of Health recently issued emergency suspension or restriction orders to 28 health care professionals in Florida.

These types of suspensions are issued after it's determined that a health practitioner poses serious danger to the welfare of public health. The health department's  emergency orders are not final. The health care professionals are entitled to  hearings.

A Florida-based health care company is apologizing to the Haitian community after it posted what many are calling a discriminatory job ad in New York.

Interim Healthcare, which has its corporate office in Sunrise, offers health care services across the country through 300 different franchises. 

In an Oct. 15 ad looking for female nurses in Rockland County, N.Y., it explicitly states “no Haitians" should apply.

Nadege Green / Health News Florida

Charles Williams is sitting at a table with two of the young men he mentors. They get together at least twice a week.

On this day, they’re talking about sex. More specifically,  about protection.

“In the heat of the moment sometimes, a guy doesn't necessarily reach for a condom,” Williams tells Dwayne Jackson, 14, and Traivon Harris, 15. 

The boys get bashful and chuckle at William’s blunt delivery.

But Williams said he has to talk this way about safe sex with his young men. Many young, heterosexual black men don’t consider themselves at risk for HIV/AIDS.

Nadege Green / Health News Florida

Poison Ivy came out as a transgender woman to her family in January.

Her grandmother kicked her out of the house. 

“She didn’t want to see me transitioning,” said Poison Ivy, who asked that her real name not be used. “It’s just so hard for her to notice that her grandson, someone that has loved her for a long time is becoming a woman.”

So Poison Ivy moved in with friends. Some of them don’t know what the 18-year-old does for a living.

The Miami-Dade Crisis Intervention Team trains police officers in Miami-Dade and Broward counties on how to respond to calls that involve someone who is mentally ill.

The CIT had trained more than 4,500 police officers across 35 police departments.

In February, 25-year-old Lavall Hall was killed by a Miami Gardens police officer. He suffered from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Police say Hall was carrying a broom and attacked two officers.

The family of a mentally ill man who was killed by a Miami Gardens police officer in February released the video of the shooting to the media Wednesday at a press conference.

The family says police were called on Feb. 15th because Lavall Hall was wielding a straw broom outside his house. They needed help to get him to a mental health hospital.

Police ended up killing Hall.

Moments Up To The Shooting

Six young people sat around a table sharing their personal stories to an audience of about 20 people.

Jack Lee Jordan was first. He said he knew he was a boy from a very young age and not his assigned birth sex of female. His mom took it hard.  She cried a lot and was in denial, he said.

He remembers a shopping trip where he asked his mom for a suit and tie.

TransCon, a day-long conference at Barry University, called for more public education about trans issues.

There were workshops that covered health issues, employment and spirituality. But one of the best-attended gatherings addressed discrimination and transgender equality.

Charo Valero, a field organizer with SAVE DADE, a gay rights organization, was one of the moderators at the “Next Step With Prejudice Reduction Workshop.”

When Monica Howell gave birth to her daughter Celeste earlier this year, the Miami-Dade school teacher knew she wanted to breastfeed for as long as possible.

On her first day back in the classroom after maternity leave, Howell carried a new set of supplies: an electronic breast pump, ice packs and storage containers for her milk.

She met with her assistant principal to schedule the times she planned to pump.

"Her reply to me was, 'Absolutely not, we cannot accommodate breastfeeding mothers,'” Howell said.