Mark Schreiner

Mark Schreiner has been the producer and reporter for "University Beat" on WUSF 89.7 FM since 2001 and on WUSF TV since 2007.

He has worked as an anchor, reporter and producer at radio stations in Tampa and his native Chicago since 1992.

There's no rush to pick the new leader for USF Health, but three internal candidates have been named. 

The Tampa Bay Times reports search firm Quick Leonard Kieffer is still looking for candidates from outside USF, but has named three current USF Health executives, who are scheduled to be interviewed this Friday. 

Mark Schreiner / WUSF

When members of USF Health Service Corps help their community, they’re also helping hone their own skills. 

USF Health is investigating a breach that exposed the personal information of about 140 patients treated by its doctors at Tampa General Hospital.

Moffitt Cancer Center

For some cancers, chemotherapy and radiation may be the best - or only - treatments available. Yet there are times when the side effects of the treatment are almost as bad as the disease they are intended to cure. 

For the last few years, the USF Ataxia Research Center and the Friedreich's Ataxia Research Alliance (FARA) have hosted a pair of events in Tampa: a national symposium that brings together Friedreich ataxia experts from around the world, and a gala ball that raises hundreds of thousands of dollars for research.

While they're preparing for this year's events, there's a bit of extra pressure -- the USF Ataxia Research Center is also the lead site on a national study of a potent antioxidant treatment for the life-shortening, degenerative neuromuscular disorder.


Lori Stanton’s 89-year-old mother, Elli, has a neurological disorder where fluid builds up in the brain. In many cases, including Elli’s, it’s accompanied by severe dementia. Until recently, Stanton cared for her mom in her New Tampa home.

“It’s all-consuming, it’s morning to bedtime and then all night,” Stanton said.

Tampa Police have found a homeless woman who left Tampa General Hospital this past weekend before she had learned that she has tuberculosis.

The Tampa Bay Times reports Sarah Williams, 53, was located Tuesday evening at S. Dale Mabry Highway and Inman Avenue. Officers called for an ambulance, which took Williams back to Tampa General.

Laughter -- it's good for what ails you.

That was the conclusion of a 2010 study by researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. For seven years, they followed over 53,000 Norwegians, and found those with a sense of humor tended to be healthier and more likely to reach the age of 70.

And of the more than 2,000 study participants with cancer, those with a sense of humor were 70 percent more likely to survive than those more humor-challenged.

Eric Younghans / USF Health

Klasko, who announced last week he's leaving USF Health to become the president of Thomas Jefferson University and president/CEO of the Jefferson University Hospital System, spoke to WUSF's University Beat about his decision to move on. 

Here are three highlights from the conversation:

 

Medtronic

Last week on WUSF's University Beat, we told you how attendees at the recentStudents With Diabetes National Conference hosted by USF Health's Bringing Science Home heard about an "artificial pancreas."

Klasko Leaving USF

Jun 20, 2013

Stephen Klasko, the longest-serving dean in the history of the USF Morsani College of Medicine and CEO of USF Health, has been named the new president of Thomas Jefferson University and president/CEO of the TJUH System.

For the third year, young people from around the country gathered in Tampa for the Students With Diabetes National Conference -- a chance for them to find out what they need to do to handle the challenges of growing up with a disease that can take up a good portion of their time and energy.

More than 120 people from 23 states and three countries attended the three-day event hosted by USF earlier this month at the Sheraton Suites Tampa Airport Westshore.

Eric Younghans / USF Health

Did Dr. Stephen Klasko pull his name from consideration for the position as chancellor of the University of Nebraska Medical Center due to questions about discrepancies on his resume? 

That seems to be the theory proposed by newspapers in both Tampa and Omaha.

And the issues aren't related to his education or his work experience - they appear to be over when exactly he ran a number of marathons.

Two leaders of Florida medical schools, including USF's Dr. Stephen Klasko, are among the four finalists to be the next chancellor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

For most students, starting college is a big enough challenge. But for some young people, the transition is made even more difficult by the fact that they’re diabetic.

Students with Diabetes is an organization that started at USF Health and has since spread to more than 30 chapters on other college campuses and locations, along with members on about 100 campuses.

Students with Diabetes’ creator, Miss America 1999, USF graduate Nicole Johnson, says the group serves as a support community for 18 to 30 year old diabetics and their loved ones.

Between 6,500 and 7,000 runners and walkers are expected to trek through the USF Tampa campus Saturday morning for the PNC Bank Miles for Moffitt.

The event has raised over $1 million since it was launched in 2006. Organizers hope to raise another $300,000 this year.

Race president Karen Dalton says Miles for Moffitt is unusual in that every dollar of participants' registration fees goes directly to cancer research.

USF Health has broken ground on its new Specialty Care Center in the Villages, providing coordinated  health care to the country's largest community of people over the age of 55.

According to USF Health officials, the center will serve as a collaborative compliment to The Villages Health primary care network, which is going to soon have seven different medical offices in The Villages.

Speaking at the formal ground-breaking last week, Dr. Stephen Klasko, USF Health CEO, said such collaboration allows residents to receive health care without leaving their neighborhood.

Pages