Mark Schreiner

Mark Schreiner has been the producer and reporter for "University Beat" on WUSF 89.7 FM since 2001 and on WUSF TV since 2007.

He has worked as an anchor, reporter and producer at radio stations in Tampa and his native Chicago since 1992.

Some students in the University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine experienced the "luck of the Irish" this past Friday, as they got their first choice of hospital where they'll do their residencies.

It was all part of "Match Day," where students open an envelope that sets them on their career path for the next three to seven years, depending on their specialty.

When crimes like the Pulse nightclub shooting or the shootings at the Ft. Lauderdale Hollywood International Airport occur, there are two major responses by law enforcement.

First, there's the immediate, tactical reply. Then there's the forensic investigation.

A center that brings training for those two stages together under one roof is in the works in Pasco County, and University of South Florida researchers are playing a major role.

While construction of the new University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine and the USF Health Heart Institute is expected to start this August, there's now a better idea of what the final product should look like.

USF unveiled preliminary renderings of the nearly $153 million facility Tuesday.

If you've ever thought about pursuing a career in the healthcare field, the University of South Florida would like to talk to you.

USF Health, along with national health occupation education provider HOSA, are hosting a healthcare career symposium Saturday, February 4, at the Marshall Student Center.

Every semester, the University of South Florida picks an outstanding graduate on each of the system’s three campuses.

This fall, the honoree on the Tampa campus has a curriculum vitae that would make some professors jealous.

Stephanie Radu, 21, was born in Toronto and lived in twelve cities, training as a competitive swimmer and surfer, before settling in Florida.

In a world increasingly dominated by social media and cell phones, sometimes a simple letter home can make a difference when it comes to making sure students have their important immunizations.

That's the finding of research conducted by USF College of Public Health’s Dr. Jill Roberts, an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health.

Jeffrey Sargent enlisted in the U.S. Army shortly after graduating from high school in 1999. He ended up serving 12 years, including two tours of duty during Operation Iraqi Freedom. During that time, he received a Bronze Star, but also lost several members of his unit, including his platoon leader.

Over a decade into his military career, during a promotion ceremony to Sgt. First Class, he suffered his first panic attack. It was the initial sign of post-traumatic stress disorder.

(Originally aired August 9, 2016)

Bill Nagely was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2009, and for the past three years, he and his wife, Sheila, have made the hour-long drive from their home in St. Petersburg to the University of South Florida Health Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute in Tampa.

"It’s really improved our quality of life to be able to have the resources they have here at Byrd," Sheila Nagely said. "They have a wonderful support group, which really helps me, and they just are connected with all the resources that we need."

  It’s a problem that affects 700,000 people in the ten-county Tampa Bay area: food insecurity.

Thomas Mantz, the Executive Director of the group Feeding Tampa Bay says food insecurity is when people like you and me don’t have consistent access to food due to a lack of money or other resources. 

While Florida has about a quarter of the almost 400 reported cases of Zika in the United States, no one has been infected in Florida. But that's not stopping local public health experts from advising people to protect themselves.

You would think after playing defensive end for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers for nine years, and then 11 more as a Tampa firefighter, John Cannon might have back pain.

But the engineer-driver said he feels pretty good, thanks in part to a short exercise program TFR put together with researchers from USF Health - a program that, with the help of a $1.3 million federal grant, will soon be tested by firefighters in the Tampa Bay area's three largest departments.

The University of South Florida has released an audit critical of some of the practices at its high-tech Tampa medical training center, shortly after the head of the center stepped down.


Florida may pay for burials of students whose remains were once on the grounds of the now shuttered Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys.

The Dozier School for Boys in the Florida Panhandle town of Marianna closed in 2011, after allegations by former inmates of decades of torture and abuse.

University of South Florida researchers have been working for years to identify dozens of remains found in unmarked graves on the site, and they've just released their final report.

The University of South Florida has already received $17 million from state lawmakers for a new building that would house its medical school and heart health institute in downtown Tampa. 

Now comes word that university officials are going to seek an additional $22.5 million for the project in the next fiscal year - money they say they likely can't finance the project without.

There's an age-old question that plagues our nation’s changing health care system: Are higher health care costs  for patients always associated with higher quality goods and services?

University of South Florida College of Public Health researcher Troy Quast 's work, took on that question, as it pertained to one of the most significant diseases affecting Americans: diabetes. 

His article, "Quality of Care and Relative Resource Use for Patients with Diabetes,” was published in the June issue of the American Journal of Managed Care.


UPDATED WITH ARRIVAL INFORMATION 8/30 11 PM:

USF student Barbara "Barbie" Jimenez returned to Tampa Friday afternoon, where she was reportedly able to walk from a medical transport plane to an ambulance.

The 22-year-old senior was taken from the International Jet Center to Tampa General Hospital, where she will continue recovering from injuries sustained in a car accident in Cuba in early August.

Jimenez and her family didn't say anything reporters Friday, but they said she would speak in the coming days.

USF Beta Gamma chapter of Lambda Theta Alpha

The University of South Florida student stuck in a Cuban hospital because her family doesn't have health insurance may be a step closer to returning home.

Barbara "Barbie" Jimenez, 22, was in a coma for five days after a car accident in Cuba. She's since come out of the coma, but has been stuck in Cuba since her family can't afford to fly her back to the U.S.

Now, according to Congressman David Jolly, a Bay area air ambulance company has offered to bring Jimenez home free of charge.


A University of South Florida senior is in a Cuban hospital following a recent car crash, but she can't return to the United States because her family doesn't have health insurance. 

The National Weather Service, as well as rain-weary residents, continue to keep a cautious eye on numerous rivers around West Central Florida.

With more thunderstorms possible the rest of the week, officials are closely monitoring the Alafia River and the Little Manatee River in Hillsborough County and Cypress Creek and the Withlacoochee River in Pasco County.

USF Health Communications

Officials with the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine say they have the kind of dilemma most schools would envy - a record number of students applying for this year's class.

A total of 5,235 students applied for a slot in the class starting medical school this month, up 24 percent from a year earlier.

In addition, secondary applications, which are sent to students the school is interested in, came in from 2,920 students. That's an increase of 28 percent from a year earlier.

In June of 2013, Robert Stephens of Tampa received a phone call from his sister. She told him that an uncle they had never met had died at the Dozier School for Boys in 1937 under mysterious circumstances.

She added that University of South Florida researchers wanted Stephens to submit a DNA sample to see if they could identify his 15-year-old uncle as one of the bodies believed to be buried in an unmarked graveyard on the now closed reform school’s grounds.

Former Tampa Bay Buccaneers kicker Lawrence Tynes is suing the team, claiming unsanitary conditions at Bucs' facilities led to a MRSA infection that he says ended his career.

In a lawsuit filed in Broward County Circuit Court Monday, Tynes claimed the team "failed to disclose and actively concealed ongoing incidents of infection" among other people at the facility.

UPDATE 3/18/15 10:45 a.m.

Updated headline to indicate the Florida Department of Law Enforcement will conduct "an inquiry" and not "an investigation" into USF's findings.

In an email sent to WUSF 89.7 News Wednesday morning, FDLE Communications Director Gretl Plessinger said, "We are conducting a preliminary inquiry to assess any new information from the January USF report.  If there is criminal predicate, we will open an investigation."

ORIGINAL POST 3/17/15 5 p.m.

With a single sentence, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement indicated it will look into what investigators from the University of South Florida have turned up at the Dozier School for Boys in the Panhandle town of Marianna.

On Thursday, University of South Florida officials will once again ask the Florida Board of Governors to approve their request for $57 million in state funding to build the Morsani College of Medicine and Heart Institute in downtown Tampa.

Aimee Blodgett / USF News

Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, better known as MRSA, is one of the most dangerous infections around, thanks to its resistance to most treatments, and its ability to easily spread to patients in high-risk areas such as hospitals and nursing homes.

USF Health

Even with Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn and Tampa Bay Lightning owner Jeff Vinik voicing their support for the plan, the Florida Board of Governors put the University of South Florida's proposed downtown Morsani College of Medicine on hold for the moment.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

Gordon "Skip" Beadle has a prosthetic right leg, the tenth such device he’s depended on since the retired U.S. Marine was wounded during the Vietnam War 50 years ago.

"It’s a symbiotic leg. It has a microprocessor in the knee and also the ankle," he said. "This leg in particular gives me a huge amount of balance. Before this leg, I pretty much had to use a cane cause I’d lose my balance. (Now) I can walk without a cane; I can walk uphill, downhill."

Updated at 7:00 p.m. with sound & President Genshaft's letter


USF Health

A new University of South Florida medical school planned for downtown Tampa could be "bigger than baseball," Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn told a group of USF trustees today.

Buckhorn was referring to the possibility that the Tampa Bay Rays could eventually move from Tropicana Field to another field of dreams on an empty lot in downtown Tampa.

He spoke during a meeting of the USF Board of Trustees Health Workgroup at USF's Center for Advanced Medical Learning and Simulation (CAMLS), which would be a gallstone's throw from the new complex.

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