Mark Schreiner

Mark Schreiner has been the producer and reporter for "University Beat" on WUSF 89.7 FM since 2001 and on WUSF TV since 2007.

He has worked as an anchor, reporter and producer at radio stations in Tampa and his native Chicago since 1992.

A pair of physicians from the University of South Florida have returned to Tampa after a trip to Puerto Rico, but they're already looking forward to going back to help in the island's long-term recovery.

A pair of University of South Florida physicians left over the weekend for Puerto Rico with some much-needed medical supplies. But it's just the beginning of USF's outreach to the island.

Resiliency is defined as the ability to recover from difficulties.

And when it comes to a life-changing event like Hurricane Irma, there are two different kinds of resiliency: an individual’s ability to bounce back and “community resiliency.”

Hillsborough County senior citizens stuck without power and looking for a cool place to go have some options Friday and next week.

A 7-year-old Polk County girl died Wednesday from carbon-monoxide poisoning at a home with a generator running inside after Hurricane Irma, authorities said.

Are you a ‘dog person,’ yet you own a cat? Is there a way to increase the emotional connection with your pet? Can overindulging your pet encourage them to misbehave?

A researcher at USF Sarasota-Manatee is looking at how the interactions between humans and their animals contribute to the physical, social and psychological well-being of both sides of such a relationship.

You probably know the Nietzsche quote: “That which does not kill us makes us stronger.”

One University of South Florida researcher is studying that adage – in nature.

Right now, if a researcher wants to confirm there’s a red tide outbreak – you know, that algae bloom known as Karenia brevis that turns water red or brown, kills marine life and makes a horrible stench – they have to take a water sample, bring it back to the lab, put it on a microscope, and literally count the number of algae cells.

According to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes – many of them the Type 2 form of the disease. That's where the body doesn't produce enough insulin on its own.

Tampa General Hospital is already billed as one of the busiest organ transplant centers in the country.

Now, in conjunction with the University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine and its South Tampa Center for Advanced Medical Care, they’re creating what they call a new model for advanced organ transplantation.

Sixty feet beneath the water’s surface in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary sits one of the world’s three undersea research laboratories.

And as you read this, the Aquarius Reef Base is home to an international crew of researchers, including Dominic D’Agostino, an associate professor at the University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine.

Among the $410 million worth of projects struck from the new state budget by Governor Rick Scott's veto pen are a number of items with ties to the Tampa Bay area.

With the beginning of hurricane season Thursday, officials in Pinellas County are encouraging residents to check what their evacuation levels are because they may have changed since last year.

Thanks to updated storm surge maps, some people are now either more or less likely to evacuate in a hurricane.

It’s no secret that the U.S. population is aging. And with that comes the need for more medical professionals.

Mark Schreiner / WUSF 89.7 News

A "body farm" where researchers can study how corpses decompose will open next week in the Tampa Bay area with the burial of four donated bodies.

Officials from Pasco County and the University of South Florida attended a dedication ceremony Friday for the Adam Kennedy Forensics Field, a three and a half acre patch of land on the grounds of the Pasco Sheriff's detention facility in Land O' Lakes, just north of Tampa.

When the 164 members of this year’s University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine graduating class donned their caps and gowns last month, they were students.

Now, when they put their white lab coats on, they are doctors.

During the commencement ceremony at Tampa’s Straz Center, the new physicians heard from Dr. Victor J. Dzau, the president of the National Academy of Medicine.

The University of South Florida temporarily stopped one researcher's work with the West Nile Virus earlier this year after eight birds died during the research.

According to a statement from USF, that work has since been restarted after the issues involved were addressed.

“To be, or not to be” opens one of the most famous soliloquies of William Shakespeare – but an exhibit currently at the University of South Florida changes that phrase to “To be well, or not to be well.”

"And there’s the humor of it" Shakespeare and the four humors is a traveling exhibition designed by the National Library of Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health.

Since mid-March, it’s been on display at the USF Shimberg Health Sciences Library, which recently hosted a reception for students and faculty to check it out.

Some students in the University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine experienced the "luck of the Irish" this past Friday, as they got their first choice of hospital where they'll do their residencies.

It was all part of "Match Day," where students open an envelope that sets them on their career path for the next three to seven years, depending on their specialty.

When crimes like the Pulse nightclub shooting or the shootings at the Ft. Lauderdale Hollywood International Airport occur, there are two major responses by law enforcement.

First, there's the immediate, tactical reply. Then there's the forensic investigation.

A center that brings training for those two stages together under one roof is in the works in Pasco County, and University of South Florida researchers are playing a major role.

While construction of the new University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine and the USF Health Heart Institute is expected to start this August, there's now a better idea of what the final product should look like.

USF unveiled preliminary renderings of the nearly $153 million facility Tuesday.

If you've ever thought about pursuing a career in the healthcare field, the University of South Florida would like to talk to you.

USF Health, along with national health occupation education provider HOSA, are hosting a healthcare career symposium Saturday, February 4, at the Marshall Student Center.

Every semester, the University of South Florida picks an outstanding graduate on each of the system’s three campuses.

This fall, the honoree on the Tampa campus has a curriculum vitae that would make some professors jealous.

Stephanie Radu, 21, was born in Toronto and lived in twelve cities, training as a competitive swimmer and surfer, before settling in Florida.

In a world increasingly dominated by social media and cell phones, sometimes a simple letter home can make a difference when it comes to making sure students have their important immunizations.

That's the finding of research conducted by USF College of Public Health’s Dr. Jill Roberts, an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health.

Jeffrey Sargent enlisted in the U.S. Army shortly after graduating from high school in 1999. He ended up serving 12 years, including two tours of duty during Operation Iraqi Freedom. During that time, he received a Bronze Star, but also lost several members of his unit, including his platoon leader.

Over a decade into his military career, during a promotion ceremony to Sgt. First Class, he suffered his first panic attack. It was the initial sign of post-traumatic stress disorder.

(Originally aired August 9, 2016)

Bill Nagely was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2009, and for the past three years, he and his wife, Sheila, have made the hour-long drive from their home in St. Petersburg to the University of South Florida Health Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute in Tampa.

"It’s really improved our quality of life to be able to have the resources they have here at Byrd," Sheila Nagely said. "They have a wonderful support group, which really helps me, and they just are connected with all the resources that we need."

  It’s a problem that affects 700,000 people in the ten-county Tampa Bay area: food insecurity.

Thomas Mantz, the Executive Director of the group Feeding Tampa Bay says food insecurity is when people like you and me don’t have consistent access to food due to a lack of money or other resources. 

While Florida has about a quarter of the almost 400 reported cases of Zika in the United States, no one has been infected in Florida. But that's not stopping local public health experts from advising people to protect themselves.

You would think after playing defensive end for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers for nine years, and then 11 more as a Tampa firefighter, John Cannon might have back pain.

But the engineer-driver said he feels pretty good, thanks in part to a short exercise program TFR put together with researchers from USF Health - a program that, with the help of a $1.3 million federal grant, will soon be tested by firefighters in the Tampa Bay area's three largest departments.

The University of South Florida has released an audit critical of some of the practices at its high-tech Tampa medical training center, shortly after the head of the center stepped down.

Pages