Lindsey Kilbride

Reporter Lindsey Kilbride returned to WJCT News after completing a radio documentary program at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine.

Lindsey is a former WJCT News intern with a bachelor's degree in multimedia journalism from the University of North Florida.

When she's not drinking coffee on deadline, she can be found cuddling her cats. 

A new state law requires districts to step up school safety and mental health. A provision in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Act requires all Florida public schools to have a police officer on campus or a trained employee who carries a gun.

Florida Sens. Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio are urging the Army Corps of Engineers to modernize Putnam County’s water supply system after the county administrator requested the federal help nearly a year ago.  

With two grocery stores set to close about 10 miles apart on Jacksonville’s Northwest side, some city officials are concerned residents won’t have enough access to healthy, fresh food.

Jacksonville would get new flashing crosswalk signals and an education campaign focused on pedestrian and cyclist safety if a couple of bills are passed by City Council.

Orange Park Medical Center is kicking off monthly classes teaching the public how to stop heavy bleeding using tourniquets or even T-shirts.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott is outlining next steps for school districts, following his signing this month of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Safety Act.

Orange Park Medical Center is celebrating a new state law cementing its status as a trauma center. The law settles a long-fought battle over how many trauma centers are allowed to operate in Florida and where.

A Navy wife says Naval Hospital Jacksonville left a portion of a needle in her spine when she gave birth there over a decade ago.

Jacksonville City Councilman Garrett Dennis said he wants to discourage violence on city properties by declaring them “Hit-Free zones.”

Jacksonville Fire And Rescue Department Rescue Chief David Castleman said a city-funded opioid-intervention pilot program seems to be working. He presented data about the four-month-old program to a city council committee Monday morning.

The Jacksonville Medical Examiner’s Office Monday received a mobile-unit to house more office space. It’s part of a $206,000 city plan to temporarily address the morgue’s overcrowding.

A proposal to allow unused prescription drugs to be donated to low-income patients is advancing in the Florida Legislature. Florida already allows cancer drugs be donated.

A Jacksonville high school for teens in addiction-recovery wants to be able to serve more students and provide additional programming. The nonprofit school is asking the state for $700,000.


With less of a threat, the state of Florida has discontinued its Zika virus hotline.

The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office showed off a new-to-the-city technology for helping to solve gun crimes. The Jacksonville City Council approved the purchase of a $250,000 Integrated Ballistics Identification System in March. Now it’s up and running.

Updated Monday 12/18/17 at 11 a.m.

State Rep. Clay Yarborough, R-Jacksonville, is co-sponsoring a bill recognizing pornography as the cause of a public health crisis. The bill’s primary sponsor is Ross Spano, R-Dover.

The Jacksonville Beach City Council has taken a step toward banning medical marijuana dispensaries from setting up shop in the beachfront city.

The rate of babies being born early is going up across the country. There were 8,000 more preterm births in the U.S. last year than the previous year, and Jacksonville’s rate is worse than the country’s.


Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry said Tuesday, after a 3-year-old’s body was discovered in a park water tank Sunday, the city is investigating to see if there was any wrong-doing on it’s part.


Some Jacksonville residents concerned with the city’s mosquito spraying, are looking to educate the city out of its mosquito problem so spraying pesticides won’t be necessary.


The Jacksonville Transportation Authority is looking to improve bus stops by erecting more shelters and making more of them accessible to disabled riders.


The Florida Blue health insurance company is hiring 200 people for its Jacksonville customer-service department.

Seventeen men have been arrested for child-exploitation crimes, St. Johns County Sheriff David Shoar announced Friday.

Florida health officials are reminding parents and caretakers they can get kids’ back-to-school vaccines with no out-of-pocket costs — with or without insurance. All Florida counties offer the shots.

The Jacksonville City Council is advancing a bill that would add hotels to the list of businesses required to post human-trafficking awareness signs. The council’s Neighborhoods Community Service, Public Health and Safety committee approved it Monday morning.

Eight dogs who were once likely to be euthanized graduated from a canine training camp Wednesday, and their trainers happen to be Jacksonville prisoners.

The program, Teaching Animals and Inmates Life Skills, or TAILS, came to the Northside’s Montgomery Correctional Center just over three years ago, graduating a total of 93 dogs. It’s one of five prisons in North Florida and South Georgia that offer the program.


A Jacksonville City Councilman wants more types of businesses to be required to post human-trafficking awareness signs.

Although a 2015 state law requires the signs in strip clubs and massage parlors, labor trafficking often happens in different types of establishments.  

Northeast Florida Republican Congressman John Rutherford is helping lead a bipartisan effort against seismic airgun testing in the Atlantic Ocean, which could lead to drilling for oil and gas.

Rutherford said the blasting could hurt coastal businesses relying on healthy oceans.


Jacksonville City Council will soon consider funding a six-month pilot program to help treat opioid addiction with nearly $1.5 million city dollars. Councilman Bill Gulliford is introducing the bill Tuesday.


UF Health Jacksonville doctors and the hospital’s CEO say more money is needed to deal with babies born addicted to opioids — that was the message to U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL) when he visited the hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit Tuesday.


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