Julie Glenn

Julie Glenn is the host of Gulf Coast Live. She has been working in southwest Florida as a freelance writer since 2007, most recently as a regular columnist for the Naples Daily News. She began her broadcasting career in 1993 as a reporter/anchor/producer for a local CBS affiliate in Quincy, Illinois. After also working for the NBC affiliate, she decided to move to Parma, Italy where she earned her Master’s degree in communication from the University of Gastronomic Sciences. Her undergraduate degree in Mass Communication is from the University of Missouri at Kansas City.

Fluent in Italian, Julie has also worked with Italian wine companies creating and translating web content and marketing materials. Her work has been featured in international, national, and local magazines. She has served as president of the local chapter of Slow Food where she remains on the board. Her interests include cooking, traveling, and spending time with her family.

The Everglades' python problem is not news to most Southwest Floridians, but what may be is the effects the overabundance of the invasive species may soon have on humans well outside of the Everglades.

Florida law enforcement will now undergo training to better understand individuals on the autism spectrum.

House Bill 39, which mandated the training, was filed on Nov. 23, 2016 — four months after a North Miami police officer shot an unarmed behavioral therapist who begged officers in a now-viral video to not shoot the autistic man he was working with.

Open enrollment for 2018 health coverage begins in about one month, but as happened last year, rumors have already begun circulating about astronomical premium increases.

Most Floridians never saw their deductibles go up as projected last year, and several saw them actually decrease in spite of the frightening headlines. That’s because most of the quoted hikes were covered by the healthcare exchange in the end. But, now, a new batch of ominous rumors is going around.

When Florida lawmakers approved a last-minute budget in special session earlier this year, $20.4 million in federal funding for mental health services expired with no plans to make up for it.

Now, mental health and substance abuse facilities across the state are looking at slashing services—sometimes in half—because of the surprise de-funding.

With a student population just under 900, New College of Florida in Sarasota has plans to grow to 1,200 students by 2020, and now they have the money to do it. This summer the school started phase one of its growth plan with $5.4 million on funding- another $45 million is expected to be spent on new buildings, forty more professors, and expanding enrollment.

Not long after an investigative story appeared in the Fort Myers News Press, a “no trespassing” sign appeared on what was once considered public land in the heart of the Fort Myers’ Dunbar neighborhood.

That newspaper report found that the city dumped toxic sludge there 50 years ago, didn’t tell any of the neighbors, and haven’t cordoned off the area or cleaned it up.

Food has been a source of pleasure and nourishment for centuries, but in recent years it’s also become a source of discomfort. For example, today is national chocolate chip cookie day, but any one of the ingredients in a simple cookie could trigger a reaction because of an allergy or sensitivity.


The U.S. dollar is strong against the Canadian dollar and the Euro. It's a financial situation that's good for Americans traveling abroad but a worry for Southwest Florida’s international tourism industry. The unfavorable exchange rate means Canadians and Europeans will get less for their money than they’re used to. Realtors in the area say some are choosing to stay put this winter, rather than visiting Florida.