Jim Saunders - News Service of Florida

Jim Saunders is the Executive Editor of The News Service Of Florida.

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In a detailed, 65-page ruling, a federal appeals court Friday said a trial is needed in a legal battle about whether Disney theme parks have taken adequate steps to meet the needs of customers who have autism and cannot wait long times for rides.

In an issue that drew widespread attention during this year’s legislative session, the House on Friday gave final approval to a measure that will largely block minors from getting married in Florida.

Meeting in a rare Saturday session, the Florida Senate approved revamping regulations for payday loans and supported expanding workers’ compensation insurance benefits for police and firefighters who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder.

TALLAHASSEE — Florida Power & Light on Monday asked state regulators to give approval by Dec. 1 of a plan to shut down a jointly owned coal-fired power plant in Jacksonville.

Agency For Health Care Administration

Liz Dudek, a longtime state health official who helped lead an overhaul of the Medicaid program, is retiring as secretary of the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration, Gov. Rick Scott announced Wednesday.

Dudek, who has served as secretary since March 2011, shortly after Scott took office, will be replaced on an interim basis by Deputy Secretary Justin Senior. Dudek's retirement from the $141,000-a-year job is effective Oct. 3.

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Nearly eight years after a Sarasota County woman committed suicide, the Florida Supreme Court said Thursday her husband can pursue a lawsuit against a physician about care provided before her death.

Opponents of a ballot initiative to legalize medical marijuana gave a glimpse of their strategy Monday by releasing a video alleging the measure would lead to a plethora of "pot shops" similar to the marijuana industry in California.

Florida House of Representatives

After the Senate blocked the idea this year, the House likely will renew a push in 2016 to let patients stay overnight at ambulatory-surgical centers and could again seek to open the door for longer-term recovery centers.

The U.S. Supreme Court this fall will hear arguments in a challenge to the way Florida sentences people to death --- a challenge backed by three former Florida Supreme Court justices and the American Bar Association.

The case, which stems from the 1998 murder of an Escambia County fast-food worker, focuses on the role that juries play in recommending death sentences, which ultimately are imposed by judges.