Dave Dunwoody

Dave came to WUWF in September, 2002, after 14 years as News Director at the Alabama Radio Network in Montgomery, Mobile and Birmingham and a total of 27 years in commercial radio. During that time, he also served as Alabama Bureau Chief for United Press International.

The Trion, Georgia native was news director at stations in Anniston, Scottsboro and Fort Payne in Alabama, where he also broadcast football, basketball and baseball play-by-play. Dave also “spun the hits” at rock and country music stations in Lafayette, Albany and Rome, Georgia and in Burlington, North Carolina.


During his time at WUWF, Dave has earned a B.A. in Communication Arts/Journalism at the University of West Florida (Class of 2012).  He’s married to the former Linda Shiell, a Pensacola native, and they live in Pensacola with their cats Gigi and Lucy. Dave is also a passionate fan of Georgia Bulldogs and Atlanta Falcons football; the Atlanta Braves, Pensacola Blue Wahoos, Pensacola Ice Flyers, and Tampa Bay Lightning. His hobbies include comedy writing, guitar and computer sports games.


Escambia County’s first case of West Nile virus is now confirmed, prompting reminders about how to protect yourself from the disease.

As is the practice, the patient is not being identified – other than they’re an Escambia County resident. The Florida Department of Health-Escambia has issued a mosquito-borne illness advisory, for what Health Director Dr. John Lanza calls an “endemic.”

The U.S. Senate is immersed in work on reforming healthcare, and at the same time dismantling the Affordable Care Act. And the chamber faces a long road ahead.

Florida’s two senators voted on either side of the measure, as expected. Republican Marco Rubio has been a longtime opponent of ACA.

President Trump laid out his agenda before Congress on Tuesday night, and while he appeared to take a softer approach, some are not buying it. Many are having problems coping with the new administration in day-to-day life.

In a recent study by the American Psychological Association, 57 percent of respondents said the current political climate is a very or somewhat significant source of stress. Much of that traced back to Donald Trump’s election and campaign promise to build a wall along the U.S./Mexico border.

The phrase “Arrive Alive” once adorned Florida highway signs and souvenir license plates. The Florida Highway Patrol is introducing a new incarnation of that message.

At issue is a 20 percent increase in fatal crashes since 2014. FHP reports a jump in the state’s traffic deaths in 2016 with more than 3,000 fatalities. That’s the deadliest year since 2007. Through January 30 of this year, there have already been 143 traffic fatalities.

Baptist Cancer Institute’s Infusion Center is getting an infusion of its own: a $100,000 gift from Pensacola businessman and former Baptist Hospital President Quint Studer, and his wife Rishy.

“We were sitting one day and I said ‘Let’s give something to Baptist Healthcare,’” said Studer. “[Rishy] said OK and I said ‘What do you think we should give?’ and she said ‘What if we do $100,000?’”

With that, the Studers contacted Baptist President and CEO Mark Faulkner about their planned gift, and asked Faulkner if he could come up with the best use for it.

January is usually the midway point of the flu season in Florida. The state Department of Health reports that levels of the disease remained elevated overall for a second consecutive week.

Mild influenza activity was reported in 51 counties, including Escambia and Santa Rosa, during the week of January 1-7, the latest available figures. Ten counties reported moderate influenza activity, and six reported no activity.

Florida’s Supreme Court, according to some observers, may have provided a glimpse into the future of the state's death penalty statute. 

The justices giveth, and the justices taketh away. The court voted 5-2 Wednesday to forbid the state from imposing the death penalty in pending prosecutions, only to withdraw the order a few hours later. In the opinion, the court wrote that the entire death penalty law was unconstitutional, but the withdrawal came because of “human error.”