Caitlin Switalski

Caitie Switalski is a rising senior at the University of Florida. She's worked for WFSU-FM in Tallahassee as an intern and reporter. When she's in Gainesville for school, Caitie is an anchor and producer for local Morning Edition content at WUFT-FM, as well as a digital editor for the station's website. 
 
Her favorite stories are politically driven, about how politicians, laws and policies effect local communities. 
 
Once she graduates with a dual degree in Journalism and English, Caitie hopes to make a career continuing to report and produce for NPR stations in the sunshine state. 
 
When she's not following what's happening with changing laws, you can catch Caitie lounging in local coffee shops, at the beach, or watching Love Actually for the hundredth time. 
 

Three days after 17 students and staff at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland were killed in the deadliest high school shooting in U.S. history, a Miami gun show went on as planned. 

 

Florida Gun Show puts on gun shows throughout the year across the state. 

Broward County commissioners have approved a new program that aims to keep adults accused of non-violent misdemeanor crimes out of jail by giving them civil citations and coursework instead.

Leaders of Broward Health’s public hospital system met for a board meeting Wednesday to finalize their nine-month-long search for a new CEO, despite several of them facing criminal charges. 

The board voted 4-1 to offer the interim CEO, Beverly Capasso, a contract to be the president and CEO, at least until a federal oversight agreement ends,  which will be sometime in 2020. 

 

Nova Southeastern University held it’s 20th annual Celebration of Excellence Ceremony Saturday night. But this year, the two guests of honor - and the first Indian Americans to have a U.S. medical school named after them - have made NSU history. 

The husband and wife duo from Tampa, Drs. Kiran C. Patel and Pallavi Patel, announced an expansion of a donation totaling $225 million. This makes them the largest contributors in the university’s history.

 

Sewage has been spilling into Fort Lauderdale’s streets, neighborhoods and waterways for more than three years now. Millions of gallons of waste on the roads and in canals are the product of old sewage pipes and cracked infrastructure. 

But at a regular City Commission meeting Tuesday, commissioners agreed to borrow $200 million  to start updating the areas with the worst pipes. 

 

The Fort Lauderdale City Commission is set to hold a special meeting Tuesday at noon at City Hall to discuss legal options on how to deal with the ongoing opioids crisis.

During the meeting, which is open to the public, five law firms will present their advice on how they think the city should legally handle the opioid crisis.

Discussion is expected to include hot topics ranging from overdoses to access to drugs, and what legal issues are at stake if the city enforces new ordinances going forward.

Tony Lima was one of 30 Broward County residents at Tuesday’s commission meeting. The executive director of SAVE, he spoke against conversion therapy for minors – the controversial practice of trying to change a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity.

“We need to be able to as a county send a strong message that we are inclusive, that we are loving, that we are protective of their authentic selves – above all,” Lima said.

Fort Lauderdale's troublesome, aging sewage system just got a major update, according to a new city report. 

 

Broward Health operates five public hospitals that serve the majority of people living in central and northern Broward County. This week, five of the agency’s board members were indicted on charges of violating Florida’s open government law, also known as the Sunshine Law. 

The charges could affect the health system’s national search for a new CEO.

 

Nova Southeastern University is home to a leading research practice for chronic fatigue syndrome. The condition’s full name is myalgic encephalomyelitis, but it’s abbreviated to ME/CFS. The chronic immune illness causes brain and muscle inflammation. 

 

Deerfield Beach is following Miami Beach's lead in prohibiting plastic foam containers, like Styrofoam, on the sand.

Deerfield Beach officials banned polystyrene containers, like coffee cups and coolers, from all city events starting October 1. Even vendors can’t use the material, which isn’t biodegradable and often ends up in the ocean.