Andrea Muraskin

Andrea Muraskin manages the social media and website for Sound Medicine News, and contributes web and radio reporting. Prior to joining the Sound Medicine News team, she was a freelance reporter and producer, notably creating the radio feature series’ The Neighborhood Project, The Life Stories Project, and Constitution Indiana at 90.1 WFYI. Andrea was a radio coach for the Indianapolis-based youth media organization Y-Press, where she had the privilege of working with some of the world’s best teen journalists.

Andrea is the producer of the Heroic Stories Podcast and the ghostwriter of the book Beginnings, 1948. She has a bachelor’s degree in political studies from Bard College and a certificate in radio documentary from the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine.

In her spare time, she enjoys biking the flat streets of Indianapolis, comedy open mic nights, and Middle Eastern food. 

More than two years in, just who has benefited from the Affordable Care Act's exchanges and Medicaid expansion? The New York Times takes a look at the numbers. The opioid crisis has left sickle cell patients understandably frustrated. Suicide rates are up for teen girls.  And, Side Effects' Upstate New York reporter Michelle Faust takes us inside foster kids' health care. 

This week: a life expectancy study makes waves. Plans are afoot to collect nationwide data on lead pipes and guns. Plus conventional wisdom gets turned on its head when it comes to antioxidants, and a drug that caused panic last year quietly leaves the scene. 

This week: The religious objection to Obamacare's requirement that birth control be free and available makes its way to the Supreme Court again. Baltimore's lead paint problem won't go away.  We've also got a sad tale about the exploitative side of Florida's addiction recovery industry, and some hopeful news that more doctors will soon be ready and able to treat people with substance abuse disorders. Plus, there's a turf war brewing over American livers. 

Weeks before school started in Olathe, Kan., earlier this month, the town's school district began its annual effort to get low-income students signed up for dental checkups.

When parents register at the elementary schools that serve the district's poorest students, they are asked whether their children have a dentist. "And if they say no, we say, 'We have a program in our school — a dentist is coming to our school this year,' " says health services director Cynthia Galemore.