NPR News

Pages

Health
7:27 am
Sun August 2, 2015

Less-Addictive Opioids Could Boost Drug Firms' Image

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 8:28 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Goats and Soda
7:03 am
Sat August 1, 2015

How Sierra Leone's Most Famous Journalist Helped NPR Get The Ebola Story

Umaru Fofana
Ben de la Cruz NPR

It's an open secret among journalists: When reporting a major news story in an unfamiliar country, it's great to have a "fixer."

That's the catch-all term we use for our local guides to language and logistics — the people who can translate documents, interpret during interviews and generally help you figure out the most efficient and the safest way to get from one location to the next.

Read more
Shots - Health News
7:03 am
Sat August 1, 2015

No Shame, No Euphemism: Suicide Isn't A Natural Cause Of Death

Keith Negley for NPR

Beware the mention of natural causes, as in my mother's obituary:

"Norita Wyse Berman, a writer, stockbroker and artist ... died at home Friday of natural causes. She was 60."

Sixty-year-olds don't die of natural causes anymore. The truth was too hard to admit.

Fifteen years on, I'm ashamed of my family's shame. Those attending her funeral and paying shiva calls knew the truth anyway. People talk.

Read more
Goats and Soda
6:26 pm
Fri July 31, 2015

Ebola Vaccine Hailed As 'Game Changer' In Fight Against The Virus

A woman receives the rVSV-ZEBOV Ebola vaccine at a clinical trial in Conakry, Guinea. The vaccine appears effective after only one shot.
Cellou Binani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 7:53 pm

Doctors Without Borders is calling it a "champagne moment." The World Health Organization says it's a "game changer."

In a small trial, an experimental vaccine protected 100 percent of participants who were at high risk for the virus. Although the results are preliminary, they offer new hope of finally stamping out the virus in West Africa — and preventing the next epidemic.

Read more
Health
4:36 pm
Fri July 31, 2015

Planned Parenthood Controversy Raises Questions About Fetal Tissue Research

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 7:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Goats and Soda
12:54 pm
Fri July 31, 2015

She Owes Her Activism To A Brave Mom, The ADA And Chocolate Cake

Using a digital device that displays Braille characters, Haben Girma talks with President Obama at a White House ceremony marking the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act.
White House photo/Courtesy of Haben Girma

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 11:20 am

To Haben Girma's grandmother, back in East Africa, it "seemed like magic." Her granddaughter, born deaf and blind, is a graduate of Harvard Law School and works as a civil rights attorney.

Read more
Shots - Health News
12:49 pm
Fri July 31, 2015

Toxic Lead Contaminates Some Traditional Ayurvedic Medicines

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 6:49 pm

Nisha Saini has been practicing an Indian traditional health form called Ayurveda for more than 16 years. She runs a small alternative health center in Manhattan called New York Ayurveda, where customers can get massages and dietary advice. Over the counter, Saini sells an extensive array of traditional remedies concocted from herbs and spices. But there's one kind of Ayurvedic medicine she doesn't sell.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:14 pm
Fri July 31, 2015

New Ebola Vaccine Has '100 Percent' Effectiveness In Early Results

The Ebola vaccine from a trial in Guinea needs to be kept at a temperature of minus 60 degrees Celsius, the World Health Organization says. Storage devices use jet fuel to keep the right temperature for up to five days in the field.
Sean Hawkey Sean Hawkey

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 1:09 pm

In a development that could change the way the deadly Ebola disease is fought, researchers have announced promising results of a new vaccine's trial in Guinea, one of several countries affected by a historic outbreak in West Africa.

"The estimated vaccine efficacy was 100 percent," a team of researchers say.

Read more
Shots - Health News
10:06 am
Fri July 31, 2015

More Previously Uninsured Californians Got Coverage Under Obamacare

Enrollment counselor Vue Yang (left) reviews health insurance options for Laura San Nicolas (center), accompanied by her daughter, Geena, 17, at Sacramento Covered in Sacramento, Calif., in February.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Just over two-thirds of Californians who did not have health insurance before the Affordable Care Act went into full effect in 2014 are now covered, according to a survey from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

The newly insured are much less likely to say that paying for health care is a problem, compared to when they were uninsured.

Read more
TED Radio Hour
9:36 am
Fri July 31, 2015

What's A Better Way To Detect Cancer?

"We have 21st-century medical treatments and drugs to treat cancer, but we still have 20th-century procedures and processes for diagnosis," says Jorge Soto.
James Duncan Davidson/TED

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Fighting Cancer

About Jorge Soto's TED Talk

We often discover cancer after it's too late to treat. Jorge Soto is in the process of creating a simple, fast and cheap method for early cancer detection and all it takes is a few drops of blood.

About Jorge Soto

Read more
TED Radio Hour
9:36 am
Fri July 31, 2015

Is Our Narrow Focus On Cancer Doing More Harm Than Good?

"The goal of me as a cancer doctor is not to understand cancer ... the goal is to control cancer," says Dr. David Agus.
Courtesy of TED

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Fighting Cancer

About David Agus' TED Talk

Dr. David Agus believes that current research is too narrowly focused on the specifics of cancer. Instead, he thinks broader, more interdisciplinary methods are needed to control and treat cancer.

Read the study mentioned in Dr. Agus' interview in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Read more
TED Radio Hour
9:36 am
Fri July 31, 2015

How Will Open-Source Research Help Cure Cancer?

Dr. Jay Bradner believes open-source research is necessary in the fight against cancer.
Courtesy of Bradner Lab

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Fighting Cancer

About Jay Bradner's TED Talk

Giving away something that could make you a billion dollars sounds foolish. But Dr. Jay Bradner believes it's essential to share even the most prized scientific discoveries if we hope to find a cure for cancer.

Read more
TED Radio Hour
9:36 am
Fri July 31, 2015

Can Healthy Eating Reverse Some Cancers?

Healthy diets help prevent, even reverse, some health conditions. Dr. Dean Ornish believes it can also do the same for cancer.
Courtesy of TED

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Fighting Cancer

About Dean Ornish's TED Talk

Dr. Dean Ornish studied how lifestyle changes could help people with chronic heart disease; he wanted to figure out if there was a way to do the same with patients with some types of cancer.

Read more
TED Radio Hour
9:36 am
Fri July 31, 2015

What Does It Mean To Be A "Cancer Survivor"?

After Debra Jarvis went through cancer treatment, she didn't want to be labeled only as a cancer survivor.
Robert Benson Robert Benson/TED

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Fighting Cancer

About Debra Jarvis' TED Talk

Debra Jarvis had breast cancer, but it doesn't define her, she says. Jarvis explains how clinging to the identity of "survivor" sometimes stifles personal growth.

About Debra Jarvis

Read more
Consumer
5:16 pm
Thu July 30, 2015

Low-Income Teens Have Best Shot At Getting HPV Vaccine

A teenage girl gets a shot of HPV vaccine, which protects against a virus that causes cervical cancer.
Sharon Gekoski-Kimmel MCT/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 8:31 am

When it comes to getting the HPV vaccine to protect against cervical cancer, teens below the poverty line are doing better than the rest.

Among teenage girls ages 13 to 17 whose total family income was less than the federal poverty level for their family size, 67.2 percent have received the first dose of the human papillomavirus vaccine, compared to 57.7 percent for those at or above the poverty line. For teen boys, it's 51.6 percent compared to 39.5 percent.

Read more
Law
4:39 pm
Thu July 30, 2015

3 University Of Virginia Graduates Sue 'Rolling Stone' Over Retracted Story

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 6:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Environment
4:34 pm
Thu July 30, 2015

AP Study Finds Viruses Linked To Raw Sewage In Rio De Janeiro Olympic Waters

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 6:24 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:37 pm
Thu July 30, 2015

Meet The California Family That Has Made Health Policy Its Business

Peter Lee, executive director of Covered California, (left) poses with his uncle, Philip Lee, and father Peter Lee (seated) at the younger Peter Lee's home in Pasadena, Calif., in 2013.
Gina Ferazzi LA Times via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 6:24 pm

If there's such a thing as the first family of health care, the Lees may be it.

Five decades ago, two brothers helped start Medicare. Their father inspired them and they, in turn, have inspired the next generation.

To mark the anniversary of President Lyndon Johnson signing Medicare into law on July 30, 1965, three Lees sat down to reflect on the U.S. health care system.

Read more
Shots - Health News
12:03 pm
Thu July 30, 2015

How A Beauty Queen With Diabetes Found Her 'Sugar Linings'

Sierra Sandison, Miss Idaho 2014, during the "Show Us Your Shoes" parade at the Miss America pageant.
Courtesy of The Miss America Organization

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 4:31 pm

Last July, a photo changed Sierra Sandison's life. She went onstage in the Miss Idaho pageant with an insulin pump clipped to her bikini bottom. The photo and the #ShowMeYourPump hashtag she created went viral on social media and became NPR's most popular online story of the year.

Read more
Goats and Soda
11:09 am
Thu July 30, 2015

What Botswana's Teen Girls Learn In 'Sugar Daddy' Class

The bar chart tells all: That's how eighth-graders at Bakgatle Community Junior Secondary School in Botswana can compare the HIV infection rate of older men and of teenage boys.
Don Boroughs for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 5:28 pm

Chilo Ketlhoafetse struts around an eighth-grade classroom like the coolest guy in Botswana, warming the students up to talk about an awkward subject. He calls out "Nomhlaba!" and they respond "Auwe!" — nonsense words from a local childhood game. Soon he has the students clicking their fingers, dancing and following his every word.

Within an hour, the students at the Bakgatle Community Junior Secondary School in Mochudi are chanting the only message he wants to get across to them: "Older partners are riskier."

Read more
Health Care
5:07 am
Thu July 30, 2015

50 Years Ago, Medicare Helped To Desegregate Hospitals

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 12:21 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:47 am
Thu July 30, 2015

Close Listening: How Sound Reveals The Invisible

Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 12:21 pm

Over the years, scientists have mostly interpreted the world through what they can see. But in the past few decades, a culture of listening has blossomed, especially among biologists who seek to understand how animals communicate. This week Morning Edition embarks on a weekly summer series called Close Listening: Decoding Nature Through Sound. We begin with an innovation that transformed medicine by searching sounds for clues to illness and health.

Read more
Health
5:12 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Health Insurers Face Little Enforcement Of Federal Mental Health Parity Law

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:56 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:05 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Doctors Devise A Better Way To Diagnose Shaken Baby Syndrome

Frustration with a crying baby can lead some parents and caregivers to shake a baby.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 10:30 am

To tell whether a baby has been injured or killed by being shaken, the courts use three hallmark symptoms: bleeding and swelling in the brain and retinal bleeding in the eyes. Along with other evidence, those standards are used to convict caregivers of abusive head trauma, both intentional and unintentional, that can result in blindness, seizures, severe brain damage or death.

Read more
Goats and Soda
3:12 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Some Chinese Grandparents Are Making Their Grandkids Fat

At a camp for overweight children in Beijing, students stretch after taking a swim.
Kevin Frayer Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 6:36 pm

Too much love and affection from Grandma and Grandpa are helping China's "little emperors" pack on the pounds.

That is, children in China who are mainly cared for by grandparents are twice as likely to be overweight or obese, according to a study published this month in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:10 pm
Wed July 29, 2015

Texting While Walking: Are You Cautious Or Clueless?

Good thing that coat is coffee-colored.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 3:53 pm

Do you roam city sidewalks with your nose buried in your phone, oblivious to what's going on around you? If so, you may want to look up and start paying attention.

Texting while walking decreases the ability to walk in a straight line and slows down pace significantly, according to a study published Wednesday in PLOS ONE. But this gait change may not be as dangerous as it sounds, the researchers say.

Read more
It's All Politics
11:56 am
Wed July 29, 2015

Planned Parenthood Controversy Proves Complicated For Democrats

Anti-abortion activists held a rally opposing federal funding for Planned Parenthood in front of the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday.
Olivier Douliery Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 10:05 am

This post was updated at 10 a.m. ET Thursday

The latest in a series of undercover sting videos features a woman who says she worked for a company that harvested organs from fetuses aborted at Planned Parenthood.

Read more
The Salt
11:49 am
Wed July 29, 2015

To Shed Pounds, Going Vegetarian Or Vegan May Help

Most people go vegetarian out of some combination of ethical, environmental or health concerns.

But to drop pounds? That could soon become another reason to go meatless. A meta-analysis published in early July shows that people who followed a vegetarian diet overall lost more weight than people on an average American diet.

Read more
Shots - Health News
10:58 am
Wed July 29, 2015

Progress For Bill To Bolster Medicare Patients' Hospital Rights

Hospitals can call people who stay overnight outpatients, a classification that can have surprising financial consequences.
iStockphoto

The Senate unanimously approved legislation Monday night requiring hospitals across the nation to tell Medicare patients when they receive observation care but haven't been admitted to the hospital as inpatients.

The distinction is easy for patients to miss — until they get hit with big medical bills after a short stay.

Read more
Health
1:17 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

A Sense Of Self: What Happens When Your Brain Says You Don't Exist

Anil Ananthaswamy is a consultant for New Scientist Magazine.
Prasad Vaidya Dutton

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 8:49 am

Science journalist Anil Ananthaswamy thinks a lot about "self" — not necessarily himself, but the role the brain plays in our notions of self and existence.

Read more

Pages