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Goats and Soda
5:26 am
Sat November 1, 2014

Ebola Design Challenge Says Yes To The Wedding Dress Designer

Man, that PPE is hot. And not in a good way. One challenge for the designers was to come up a way to give health workers more time in personal protective equipment without overheating.
Will Kirk Jhpiego/CBID

For the past 25 years, Jill Andrews has been making extravagant dresses for brides and whimsical costumes for actors. But this past weekend, the 47-year-old wedding gown designer from Baltimore used her sewing skills to create a different kind of garment: an anti-Ebola protection suit.

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Shots - Health News
5:53 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

Payments Start For N.C. Eugenics Victims, But Many Won't Qualify

Debra Blackmon (left) was sterilized by court order in 1972, at age 14. With help from her niece, Latoya Adams (right), she's fighting to be included in the state's compensation program.
Eric Mennel WUNC

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 7:41 pm

Debra Blackmon was about to turn 14 in January 1972, when two social workers came to her home.

Court and medical documents offer some details about what happened that day. Blackmon was "severely retarded," they note, and had "psychic problems" that made her difficult to manage during menstruation.

Her parents were counseled during the visit, and it was deemed in Blackmon's best interest that she be sterilized.

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Goats and Soda
5:51 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power Sees Signs Of Hope In West Africa

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power had her temperature taken as she arrived in Freetown, Sierra Leone.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 7:41 pm

Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, just returned from a four-day trip to all three of West Africa's Ebola-stricken countries. Speaking with Melissa Block of All Things Considered, she said she saw promising signs of recovery but had also gained a sense of just how much work must still be done.

In Liberia, Power was struck by the gratitude expressed to the United States for "rescuing these countries in their hour of greatest need."

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Goats and Soda
4:54 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

How Liberia Is Starting To Beat Ebola, With Fingers Crossed

Children play in the West Point neighborhood of Monrovia last week. West Point has been hit hard by Ebola. So local leaders formed their own Ebola task force, which goes door to door looking for cases.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 7:41 pm

If you want the inside scoop about what's happening with the Ebola outbreak, then just hang out at the Mamba Point Hotel in Monrovia.

It's packed with scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, international reporters and a bunch of guys and gals in camouflage from the U.S. Army.

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Health
4:51 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

Maine Judge Rejects Nurse's Quarantine Order

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 7:41 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Shots - Health News
3:46 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

A Field Of Medicine That Wants To Know Where You Live

A map of toxic waste sites can be combined with maps of waterways and cities to reveal potential health risks.
Bill Davenhall Esri

In 1854, an English doctor named John Snow pinpointed an outbreak of cholera in London to a single contaminated water pump.

A pioneer of modern epidemiology, Snow used information about where the sick people lived to deduce that they were drinking tainted water from that source.

And while using clues about peoples' locations is an important tool in public health, it's now set to make individual health care even more personal.

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Shots - Health News
12:20 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

Seeing Red During Breast Cancer Awareness Month

The lump first surfaced in my breast in 1989, when I was 36 years old.

To many young women, a small lump like that wouldn't be cause for alarm because most breast lumps are benign. But there's a long history of breast cancer in my family, so I immediately consulted a renowned breast surgeon. "It's nothing to worry about," she said. My mammogram was completely normal. She thought the lump was merely normal breast tissue.

But four years later I was diagnosed with early stage breast cancer.

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Goats and Soda
11:40 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Why My Grandma Never Had A Pap Smear

A nurse uses a diagram of the female reproductive system to explain the do-it-yourself careHPV test at the Uganda Cancer Institute in Kampala.
Will Boase PATH

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 12:56 pm

"So, did Grandma ever have a Pap smear?"

A strange question for a son to ask his mom, as I did last Thursday, but it came to mind because of careHPV.

The careHPV test is a quick, simple DNA test for the primary cause of cervical cancer — human papillomavirus (HPV) — could overcome serious obstacles to screening for cervical cancer in developing countries.

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The Two-Way
11:04 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Maine Judge Rejects State's Bid To Restrict Nurse's Movements

Nurse Kaci Hickox and her boyfriend, Ted Wilbur, take delivery of a pizza at their home in Fort Kent, Maine, on Thursday. A judge has ruled that the state cannot compel Hickox to remain in isolation if she's not showing signs of Ebola infection.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 2:40 pm

Updated at 12:55 p.m. ET

A judge in Maine has turned down a request by state officials seeking authority to compel nurse Kaci Hickox to remain in her home for the duration of a 21-day incubation for Ebola. Since returning from West Africa, where she treated Ebola patients, Hickox has refused to accept a voluntary quarantine.

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The Salt
5:21 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Cash For Halloween Candy? Dentists' Buyback Program Is Booming

Dr. Curtis Chan, a dentist in Del Mar, Calif., loads up a truck with 5,456 pounds of candy to deliver to Operation Gratitude during the Halloween Candy Buyback on Nov. 8 last year. Chan personally collected 3,542 pounds of candy from patients.
Courtesy of Curtis Chan

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 9:34 am

If your little ghosts and goblins dump their candy on the living room floor tonight, go ahead: Let them at it. They can sort, then trade, and gorge on their favorites.

But if you're like many parents, by tomorrow morning you may want to get rid of some of this candy glut.

One possible solution? Check out the Halloween Candy Buyback program, which was founded by dentist Chris Kammer in Wisconsin. Kammer's office offers $1 a pound to buy back candy collected by the young trick-or-treaters in his practice.

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Shots - Health News
4:57 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Look Here: Phone App Checks Photos For Eye Disease

Examples of what the iPhone app looks for: The white reflection from an otherwise dark pupil can indicate a tumor, a cataract or other eye problems.
Claire Eggers NPR

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 11:02 am

There's now free software for your iPhone that lets you check for early signs of certain eye diseases.

The idea for the app comes from a Baylor University chemist named Bryan Shaw. We introduced you to Shaw late last year.

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Shots - Health News
4:57 am
Fri October 31, 2014

Virus Sleuths Chip Away At Ebola Mysteries

Stringy particles of Ebola virus (blue) bud from a chronically infected cell (yellow-green) in this colorized, scanning electron micrograph.
NIAID Science Source

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 4:55 pm

Vincent Racaniello, who studies viruses at Columbia University, says Ebola has recently become his obsession.

"I find myself reading incessantly about Ebola when I should be doing other things," says Racaniello, host of the online show This Week in Virology, which has devoted several recent programs to Ebola.

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Commentary
10:27 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Kennedy: Are We Ready For Big Tobacco-Style Marketing For Marijuana?

Low-dose pot-infused cookies, called the Rookie Cookie, sit on the packaging table Sept. 26 at The Growing Kitchen in Boulder, Colo. The state legalized recreational pot use last year.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 2:11 pm

There has been a lot of talk recently about marijuana legalization — increasing tax revenue for states, getting nonviolent offenders out of the prison system, protecting personal liberty, possible health benefits for those with severe illnesses. These are good and important conversations to have, and smart people from across the ideological spectrum are sharing their perspectives.

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Goats and Soda
5:13 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

So For Halloween You're Dressing Up As ... A Sexy Ebola Nurse?

Dallas-area resident James Faulk turned his yard into an Ebola treatment center for Halloween. But he has a serious side: His Twitter account raises funds for Doctors Without Borders, a group active in the fight against the virus.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 9:53 am

People living in the United States have little to no reason to fear contracting Ebola, a deadly viral illness causing an epidemic in West Africa. Yet on Friday night, some Americans will dress up in hazmat suits akin to what health workers wear when treating an Ebola patient.

And, of course, there's even a "sexy" version.

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Shots - Health News
5:08 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Ebola Researchers Banned From Medical Meeting In New Orleans

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 12:45 pm

Louisiana health officials say that anyone who's been in an Ebola-affected country over the last three weeks will be quarantined in their hotel rooms.

The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene is telling researchers who've recently traveled to Ebola-affected parts of West Africa that they can't come to the society's annual meeting. That wasn't the medical group's idea.

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Law
5:02 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Is It Legal To Quarantine Someone Who's Not Sick?

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 9:22 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The quarantines that some states are imposing to control Ebola are raising questions about how far government can go to control diseases. NPR's Rob Stein reports legal experts are debating whether states are exceeding their authority.

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U.S.
4:42 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Nurse Kaci Hickox Takes A Bike Ride, Defying Maine's Quarantine

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 6:27 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
3:35 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Medicare Concedes, Agrees To Pay For Woman's Home Health Care

A disabled woman with serious health problems who successfully challenged Medicare for denying her home health care coverage has racked up another win against the government.

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Goats and Soda
3:04 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Unlikely Marriage Of Diseases: TB And Diabetes Form A 'Co-Epidemic'

Domitilia, 57, is a diabetic patient in the Dominican Republic who contracted tuberculosis. She's now cured of TB after two years of treatment.
Javier Galeano The Union

The world is facing a double-barreled pandemic reminiscent of the dual epidemic of tuberculosis and HIV that emerged in the 1980s – only potentially much bigger.

It's a "co-epidemic" of TB and diabetes that's beginning to affect many countries around the globe — poor, middle-income and even rich nations.

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Shots - Health News
2:53 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

What A Brush With SARS Taught A Doctor About Ebola

A man wears a protective mask as he carries a bouquet of flowers at Women's College Hospital in Toronto in March 2003, when SARS fears about were widespread.
Kevin Frayer AP

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 12:45 pm

Back in 2003 I was a junior doctor working at a Chicago teaching hospital.

As one of the newer docs, my daily appointment schedule had lots of openings. Pretty much any assignment nobody else wanted came my way.

One morning the nurse who managed our clinic told me that my first patient for the afternoon may have been exposed to a deadly virus while he was traveling in Asia.

My job would be to dress up in a medical hazmat suit, examine him and figure out whether he should be quarantined.

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HNF Stories
2:31 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Ahead of Amendment 2, A Look at Marijuana's Role in Medicine

David Trawin via Flickr

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 10:02 am

In the coming days, Floridians vote on Amendment 2 which calls to legalize medical marijuana. But its role in medicine is a bit contradictory. The US classifies it as a schedule one drug, deeming it a substance with high abuse potential and no accepted medical use – the same class as heroin and LSD. Yet almost half the states in the country have legalized it for patients.

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Shots - Health News
10:56 am
Thu October 30, 2014

Why It's OK To Worry About Ebola, And What's Truly Scary

A protester outside the White House demands a halt to all flights to the United States from West Africa.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 10:19 am

Public health types are getting increasingly annoyed with people freaking out about Ebola in the United States, from governors to the general public. It's easy to see why; when I heard a swim coach was getting questions from parents worried that their children might get Ebola from the pool water, it was hard not to cue the eye roll.

On the other hand, I suspect I'm not the only person whose husband asked her to buy chlorine bleach and gloves the next time I went to the store.

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The Two-Way
10:24 am
Thu October 30, 2014

Maine's Gov. Threatens Legal Action To Force Nurse Into Quarantine

Nurse Kaci Hickox and her boyfriend, Ted Wilbur, are followed by a Maine state trooper as they ride bikes on a trail near her home in Fort Kent, Maine, on Thursday.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 3:25 pm

Updated at 1:40 p.m. ET

Hours after Kaci Hickox defiantly breached a voluntary quarantine for possible Ebola by going on a bike ride, Gov. Paul LePage threatened to use "the full extent" of his authority to compel the nurse to remain in isolation.

"I was ready and willing — and remain ready and willing — to reasonably address the needs of healthcare workers meeting guidelines to assure the public health is protected," LePage said in a statement.

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Goats and Soda
5:24 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

No Ebola, S'il Vous Plait, We're French: The Ivory Coast Mindset

Mumadou Traore says the Ivory Coast's French bureaucracy is a "blessing" when it comes to Ebola.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 6:16 pm

There are all kinds of theories why Ebola hasn't arrived in Ivory Coast, despite the fact that it shares a long and very porous border with two Ebola-afflicted countries, Liberia and Guinea.

Some Ivory Coastians credit a beefed-up border patrol. The religious citizens in this Catholic country thank God. But Mumadou Traore, who works as a field coordinator for CARE International, has a third theory. He credits the legendarily infuriating Ivorian bureacracy.

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Health
4:30 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Ebola Nurse Fights Second Quarantine In Maine

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 6:16 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
4:06 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Campuses Play Host To Tanning Beds, Despite Skin Cancer Risk

This may seems like a great campus amenity, until you get melanoma.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 12:44 pm

The frigid winters left everyone hungry for sun at the college I attended in Chicago. I still remember a friend longing for a tanning studio, preferably just down the hill from the student center. And as it turns out, in a surprising number of college campuses now, that's just the case.

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Shots - Health News
3:35 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Scientists Implicate More Than 100 Genes In Causing Autism

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 6:51 pm

The hunt to find genes that cause autism has been a long slog, one hampered by a lack of technology and families willing to be tested.

But the effort is starting to pay off. On Tuesday, researchers at more than 50 laboratories said they had identified more than 100 genes that are mutated in children with autism, dozens more than were known before.

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Goats and Soda
12:42 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Why The Ebola Evacuees Survived And What We Learned From Them

NBC cameraman Ashoka Mukpo, 33, contracted Ebola in Liberia, arrived in Nebraska for care on Oct. 6 and was released from the hospital Oct. 22.
Taylor Wilson Courtesy of Nebraska Medicine

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 3:03 pm

This is a week for reflecting on lessons learned from those who've survived Ebola.

Morning Edition aired a report on the experience of medical personnel at Emory Hospital, which has cared for four Ebola patients: three evacuees from West Africa (including Dr. Kent Brantly) and one of the Texas nurses.

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The Two-Way
11:19 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Maine To Enforce Quarantine For Nurse Who Worked In West Africa

A photo taken Sunday of Kaci Hickox in an isolation tent at University Hospital in Newark, N.J. Hickox, who was later discharged and allowed to return to her home in Maine, says she has no intention of abiding by a "voluntary" quarantine there.
Steven Hyman AP

Originally published on Wed October 29, 2014 1:08 pm

Maine's Gov. Paul LePage says he will seek to legally force a nurse to undergo a 21-day quarantine after her return from West Africa, where she volunteered to treat Ebola patients.

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Shots - Health News
9:10 am
Wed October 29, 2014

Patients Do Better After Surgery If They Do 'Prehab' First

Getting stronger before surgery has been shown to help cancer patients do better long term.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 6:51 pm

People are often told to follow a rehabilitation program following surgery to speed recovery. But starting weeks before going under the knife might help them regain function even faster.

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