HNF Stories

By Christine Jordan Sexton
1/15/2009 © Florida Health News

Florida lawmakers have siphoned off millions of dollars paid by health care professionals, the insurance industry and the business community in order to help wipe out a $2.4-billion budget deficit.

 By Carol Gentry
1/14/2009 © Florida Health News 

Congress is poised to extend the State Children's Health Insurance Program. Florida, which has more than 800,000 uninsured children, needs to find matching funds to get its share.

Two Democrats from the state have pitched a solution to the incoming administration, but since it would give a break only to some states, it's unclear whether it will fly.
 

By Carol Gentry
1/13/2009 © Florida Health News

More than 855,000 Medicare patients in Florida will see their health coverage change if President-elect Barack Obama follows through on a statement he made Sunday. 

By Christine Jordan Sexton and Carol Gentry
1/6/2009 © Florida Health News

TALLAHASSEE -- Florida’s ambitious effort to help lower the state’s number of uninsured has gotten off to a bumpy start. 

By Carol Gentry
12/23/2008 © Florida Health News 

Bowing to a decision by federal authorities, the Agency for Health Care Administration has shelved a plan to shift Medicaid patients in 25 counties into managed care -- mostly HMOs -- if they didn't specifically request not to be moved. The provision, passed in the most recent session, was seen as a gift to Medicaid HMOs because it was expected to bring them thousands of new recipients in 25 counties. (See FHN's article published May 1.)

By Carol Gentry
10/23/2008 © Florida Health News
United Healthcare of Florida Inc., one of two companies the state chose as statewide contractors for Cover Florida, will offer a preventive-care plan for an average premium of $80 a month and one that adds hospital coverage for $200 a month, CEO David Lewis says.

United’s premium prices are higher than those of the other statewide vendor, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida. But its lifetime maximum per person is also much higher.

Paul Kujda By Susan Jaffe
7/11/2008 © Florida Health News

10/04/07 © Florida Health News
Brooksville—Despite a heavy rain, local children’s health care and peace advocates gathered outside the Brooksville office of U.S. Rep. Ginny Brown-Waite Thursday to urge her to vote to override Bush’s veto of the State Children’s Heath Insurance Program (SCHIP) expansion bill.

The MoveOn.org sponsored event brought out members of the Florida Peace Action Network, the Hernando Green Party and others to advocate for healthcare not warfare.  T-shirts with slogans such as "Every Child Left Behind" were strung on a clothesline.

 07/31/07 © Florida Health News
Lisa A. Plowfield, known for establishing health services for the elderly and other  vulnerable populations, will take the helm Aug. 9 as new dean of Florida State University’s College of Nursing.
While the director of the University of Delaware’s School of Nursing, Plowfield oversaw an increase in faculty research, a new nurse residency curriculum, a new state-of-the-art simulation center and an increase in state funding.

06/06/07 © Florida Health News
By practicing “healthy behaviors”, Florida Medicaid reform plan participants can earn up to $125 a year to spend on items such as over-the-counter medications, first aid supplies, vaporizers and blood pressure monitors.

Only they don’t. Most of the $3 million in credits earned in the six months leading up to April 30 remains in the bank, according to the Agency for Health Care Administration.

04/28/07 © Florida Health News
Following two hours of emotional debate, the Florida House Friday passed an abortion bill that proponents say protects a woman’s rights and opponents say takes them away.

Among its key requirements is that a women must have an ultrasound and wait 24 hours before having abortion. 

The 71 to 42 vote approving the bill fell largely along party lines, with only two Republicans voting against the measure.

 04/24/07 © Florida Health News 
House and Senate Health and Human Services budget conferees rearched agreement this morning on how much to earmark for a new matching grant program aimed at developing treatment options for people with mental illnesses involved in the criminal justice system.
Senate budget negotiators agreed to match the $2 million already recommended by their House counterparts.

03/28/07 © Florida Health NewsTaxpayers could save money by supporting development of more mental health courts in Florida, say supporters of a matching grant program now pending in the Legislature.

In such courts, persons who are charged with nonviolent crimes and who have mental illnesses are sentenced to community treatment programs. A recent study by the Rand Corp. found this reduces their jail time and their chances of re-arrest. (See Mental Health Courts Save Money, in right-hand column.)

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